Domain

A domain is a subsection of an Internet address or a network. Both digital and physical objects may be provided with a so-called domain name, for example websites, computers or even printers or scanners. The domains serve above all the simple and clear assignment of objects.
These each have an individual and unique IP address. But since this is usually too complicated to keep in mind, the IP address in a domain is resolved. This can be practically understood as a namespace in which the domain is composed of the alphabet, the numbers from 0 to 9, hyphens and special letters of the Unicode character set. If you set up a website, you want it to be very easy for users to find. In theory, users could retrieve the website using the IP address of the web server. Since this is awkward to remember and very user-unfriendly, the Domain Name System was introduced, which requires a special structure of the domain. If you follow the domain name system, the hierarchical structure of a domain is easy to understand.

Most domains start with the www., Which is called third-level domain. He names the service of the website. Common are www. for a website, blog. for a blog or mail. for a mail server. The second component of the domain, also known as second-level domain, is the namespace of the domain and usually consists of the company name. The third module, also called top-level domain, can be found behind the name at the end of the domain. Here you will find hints on the function of a domain or a country code. Country-specific domain endings betray the user even before the dispute with the company, where this is based and operates. Alternatively, endings such as .com can be used for commercial or .org for organizations that describe the field of activity of the domain.


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